Friday, August 17, 2012

It's A End-Of-Winter Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day ... August 2012

I know I'm a little late for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day this month, but life sometimes gets in the way of blogging!  I wasn't going to bother, but then I was given a little push when I was at the supermarket doing the fortnightly shop and realised it was Daffodil Day today.  There were buckets of fabulous daffs near the check out and I just couldn't resist getting a bunch.  Then I felt I just had to share the beautiful blooms, which are definitely a rare sight here in my corner of Australia.

The closest we get to Daffodils here is this mid-week of August, when they are shipped in from down south to help raise money for a very worthwhile cause.   Daffodil Day is all about raising money for our Australian Cancer Council and I never hesitate in contributing.  As I write this blog post, it seems that Aussies have already contributed to the tune of $2.6 million!








Right now it's our end-of-winter month.  Up here in the tropical north-eastern corner of Oz, we're also in the 5th month of our 'dry' season.  Just to give a quick run-down ... it roughly began back in April and we've had around 20 days of rain in the four and a half months since then.  All in all, Mother Nature was shared about 213 mms or nearly 9 inches of rain over those 20 days.  This month we've received no rain at all and the forecast is more of the same.  By the time we get to this stage of our 'dry' my place is really drying out, and the garden has slowed down to a 'not-much-changes-from-day-to-day' stage.  So, those who tuned in last GBBD will recognise many of the blooms I shared last month. 


As you can tell by the photo above, Winter here comes complete with many, many sunny blue-sky days when you can look up and see loads of fluffy pure white clouds.  The temperatures are exceedingly mild winter temps in the eyes of many, but of course for us, things can get a little chilly sometimes.  This month we had three quite cold nights (for us!) when the mercury dropped to 6 deg C (43 F) / 7 deg C (45 F) / 8 deg C (47F) on three consecutive nights.  Those were some of the coldest overnight winter temps we've had in around 8 years, and many of us found that we needed a few layers just to warm up.  We're not used to wearing more than two layers in the winter, and the top layer is usually just a thin jumper or sweater. 

Anyway, on to what's blooming in the various corners of my place at the moment. 


Before I get to the same-oles, I should mention that my beautiful Dietes bicolor has started blooming once more.   I really want to plant lots more of this brilliant hardy perennial.  That's been on my to-do list for a while now, and I really must get some more planted before the wet season arrives at the end of the year.


I simply love the flowers of this plant and I'm looking forward to the day when I have well-established clumps of it in various corners of the property.


This is the time of year when I get to gaze upon the tiny, rather lovely, blooms of some of my Begonias. I know many regard them as rather unspectacular and inconspicuous, but a close-up view shows just how stunning these tiny little flowers really are.


Begonia 'Tiger Paws'


Cane Begonia - unknown variety


another unknown pink Cane Begonia


and this unknown.

Now for the usuals that I've been seeing for some time now.  Out in the courtyard ...


the Petunias carry on.


There are flower stalks on the Sanserviera, a flower spike on the Vriesea and some Pansy blooms.


The various Salvias continue to show their flower heads.

Down the driveway ...

the white Bauhinia continues to bloom,


as does the double flowering red Hibiscus, while the Tabebuia impetiginosa is showing its last blooms.

Out in the shadehouse ...


the Neomaricas continue their show and the Aechmea gamsepala has its pretty bright pink and electric blue flower spike still on display, while the Streptocarpus never stop blooming.

 

Of course, the Impatiens are always on show.

Finally, in the tiered garden beds, outside the shadehouse, ...


the Iresine herbstii 'Blazin Rose' blooms, the dwarf pink Euphorbia pulcherrima is still covered in its pink bracts and yellow flowers, and the Pentas lanceolata is still showing off its deep rosy pink flowers.

Spring is now just around the corner, and I'm eagerly waiting for some of my springtime blooms to open and capture my attention.



I'm joining Carol for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day.



30 comments:

  1. You always have so much flowering, even in your dry season. I love the dietes especially as it is from my part of the world.

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    1. Dietes really are wonderful plants aren't they, Garden Girl? I've decided that I really need more of them to fill in holes down my driveway garden and I will be busy planting them towards the end of our Spring. It will take a while for them to establish, but I'm hoping that planting them just before the wet season will at least give them a good start.

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    2. Part of my rearranging in the rose garden was due the clump of Dietes, which arrived at this garden in a small pot. 2 roses were rescued and given their own space again. Also harvested lots of clumps of Dietes which are hopefully going to flourish in the embattled bed outside our bedroom.

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  2. Beautiful masses of blooms for springtime. Love all of them, especially the dietes bicolor doesn't grow very well here.

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    1. Thanks Shirley. The usuals are looking pretty good, but I'm longing for some new blooms now. I'm sounding so very unappreciative aren't I?

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  3. You have lots of blooms!!:) Beautiful. I think your winter is equal to our Tucson winters. Pretty clouds, blue skies....and wonderful weather. For most people, it's perfection. For us Tucsonans it can get a little chilly:)

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    1. Yep, Rohrerbot, it seems as though our winters are very similar. I don't mind the cooler weather one little bit. I much prefer it to the heat of summer.

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  4. Bernie, everything looks beautiful...considering it's the end of winter month.
    Loved every single bloom, especially the Dietes bicolour....thanks for posting

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    1. Thanks so much Virginia. It was great to have you dropping by for a visit, and it's lovely to hear that you enjoyed a look at some of the end of winter blooms.

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  5. Hi Bernie, all those plants are lovely, I think the Dietes is one of my favourites too. And the begonias, they look as if they are made of wax, so perfect.

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    1. Thanks Catmint. I'm a big fan of Begonia blooms. I think they're such under-appreciated beauties.

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  6. So many pretty blooms all year round can be found in your garden. I know what you mean about the same as last month. That was my problem too. At this time of year there is nothing new to bloom, it is just hanging on until the trees turn and the frost hits. Most of your plants I have not heard of in my climate, but some are houseplants here. It would be nice to have them in the garden. Same with my cockatoo, he would love your climate.

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    1. Yes GardenWalk, it really is the same-ole, same-ole at this time of year. There will be some new additions come springtime, but then the summer will also be a lot of the same-ole, same-ole. Your Cockatoo would indeed be right at home here. There would be a lot of playmates for him.

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  7. Your garden looks great. I wish for a winter like yours.

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    1. I just love the winters here, Autumn Belle. I can't complain at all about the weather and winter climate. My only complaint is that summer is fast approaching now!

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  8. Your end of Winter is amazing! Love your blooms!

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    1. Thanks so much Carolyn. The winters are the saving grace for tropical living!

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  9. Bernie, you'll never regret planting the Dietes. Once established they require very little care and always look good. They grow along the Ipswich
    Motorway so will thrive in your wonderful garden.

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    1. Yes that's exactly what I need here Missy. I've been thinking about it for some time, but I'm now convinced the Dietes would be the best choice for down the driveway. I really do need something that will thrive in harsh, dry spots.

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  10. Everything is looking just lovely, Bernie. I especially love the poinsettia. I dug out an old red one that was in too shady a spot, but the dwarf pink is just so pretty.

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    1. Thanks Marisa. I lost my old red Poinsettia last year, thanks to a horrid wet season. I'll have to replace it I think as I'm really missing the red bracts this year.

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  11. Maybe in the next few decades, we will also have a semblance of your winter :-), that time we can plant more blue flowers. That Dietes, i haven't yet seen. Our Sansevieria flowers during our dry season, and it is one of the most neglect-thriving plant. I envy your Begonias too.

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    1. Yes you may be right there Kalantikan. It certainly seems as if weather patterns are changing in so many places around the world. I'm happy with our winter though and don't want it to change at all, apart from maybe a little more rain!!

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  12. Your posts make me realize how few flowers I have in my gardens. I have mostly green plants. I really need to change that. To have all those blooms surrounding me would be heavenly.

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  13. So beautiful! I have a begonia that looks exactly like the first unknown cane begonia you pictured! I love the spotted foliage. Unfortunately, I don't know its name either. I think you have the most wonderful garden, year round!

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  14. Your garden certainly has an abundance of beautiful blossoms. I really love the dietes and petunias.

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  15. Wow...I think you're wise to plant more of the Dietes...it's stunning!

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  16. Your garden is indeed wonderful. The flowers of Tabebuia impetiginosa looks very similiar to Podranea ricasoliana 'Pink Trumpet Vine', only that the leaves are different.

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  17. Bernie, Dietes is new to me. It is always a pleasure to see the flowers growing in your garden.

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  18. The Dietes bicolor is a beauty. You really should plant more of it. Great showing as usual Bernie!

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